Skip to main content

Where do we go from here? - by Christine Bor

Where were you God? Why would He let that happen to someone He calls beloved?
But He was there, because He doesn’t leave us even in the darkest corners of this world or in the darkest hour. He mourns the sanctity and blessedness of the life and breath of His Image Bearer, Ahmaud Aubery, alongside us.

But where do we go from here?

Do not be surprised as if White America is not capable of the modern day lynching of a black man. And if you are surprised, keep asking questions of yourself. The death of Ahmaud Arbery should stir up grief over the loss of sacred life and deep abiding anger over the lack of justice in our country for centuries to protect our brothers and sisters of color. And if it doesn’t, I implore you to open your eyes and hearts to see color, the color that God created us with, the color that we are all fearfully and wonderfully made to be.

And I plead with you to not stop there. But instead, keep going.

To understand the implications of race and to know that it does matter.
To educate yourself.
To ask the hard questions of yourself and lean into moments of discomfort.
To engage in conversations about race and social justice.
To reflect on the changes you need to make within yourself to build up the courage to act and disrupt racism.
To say their names.
To speak up.
To fight for.
To stand with.
To pray for.

And when it feels heavy or hard to carry, remember that Jesus has the ability to make us and mold us into the people that this world needs.

People who recognize and accept their own intersectionality and differences to then in turn celebrate the differences of others.
People who refuse to stay silent for what they know to be unjust.
People who protect the dignity of every Image Bearer.
People who willingly disadvantage themselves for the advantage of others.
People who advance justice and labor for communal, holistic, and tangible shalom.
People who return to compassion and empathy.
People who work to heal the world at every level.
People who believe that we all matter, we are all maturing, and we can all make a difference.

People who reflect God’s heart for mercy and justice.
People whose love is shaped by the Cross.

As as we seek justice, love mercy, and walk humbly while engaging in Kingdom work and laboring for shalom, remember this;

Love God most.
Love your neighbor as yourself.
This is everything.


Christine Bor has been a member at Northside for two months. What she enjoys about NCR is the community she's found that sees her, knows her, and loves her. She is currently pursuing her MSW at VCU with a specialization in Child and Adolescent Trauma. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Two unbearable griefs- by Adrianne Thompson

To my American church family:

If we need grace to bear with each other through Covid-19, you can only imagine how much grace we need to bear with each other as we try, as one family, to lament and grieve Ahmaud Arbery’s murder. Lord give us mercy. We must pray fervently because the enemy would love to help us to despise one another for so many things right now. There is so much to be grieved. There is so much to be enraged about. It is unbearable. Lord help us to do that well, and better, as one body. 

For those of you I don't know, I'm grieving, lamenting, weeping, not sleeping, wailing, raging as a white mother of four children, one of whom is a black 12-year old boy.

To the part of my church family who experienced such significant gut-wrenching trauma this week, I love you. I think I've only tasted such a small bit of the trauma still, and it is so utterly unbearable I can't breathe, sleep or stop crying. I pray God gives you spaces to lament and grieve safely and well…

The ARC of Racial Justice - a Reflection and Exhortation from Pastor Matt Lorish

Here we are again. The video footage of Ahmaud Arbery is all over social media. It is a time for lament and a time for righteous anger. I write this blog post as a continuation to the initial posts offered by Northside Church members. My aim in this post is to help my fellow white brothers and sisters think about where we go from here. At the close of Jemar Tisby’s book, The Color of Compromise, he introduces a framework that he calls the A.R.C. of racial justice. Using Jemar’s framework, I’d like to humbly offer some application points that I think are important for me and my fellow white sisters and brothers at Northside Church to move towards.

I also write this as a Christian pastor. Christians of all ethnicities are Bible people. The end-game for us isn’t just racial justice. The end-game for us is conformity to Jesus and honoring Him. Racial injustice is one of the areas in which we need God’s Spirit to change us, grow us and conform us (Rom 12:2, 2 Cor 3:18). My prayer is that…

Rehumanization in Realtime: Waging War Against White Supremacy - Charles Lewis

White supremacy kills. One reason why white supremacy kills so easily is because its legacy is one of attempted dehumanization. I say “attempted” because if you are a human being then you are created in the image of God and no power of hell, like that of white supremacy, can take that away from you. However in its attempts to dehumanize – to make us less than human – real cosmic damage can, has, and will continue to occur. 400 years of lives being cut short and livelihoods being plundered; from the plantation to the parkway. It’s easy to cut human life short when you see said life as being just short of human.

The dehumanization process happens by dictating what is truly human through a grid of whiteness, and by divesting persons of color of their freedom to flourish fully in the imago dei that God has given them. Dehumanization – by way of dictation and divestment, has been codified in American law for centuries and has left an indelible imprint on the American consciousness in such…